Tag Archives: illustration

Unplugged

Cyborg Unplug received a lot of press last year, after they announced a device that would automatically kick Google Glasses out of your wireless network. Now that Google has announced that they will discontinue the controversial device, the hype has died down, but Cyborg Unplug can still be used to get rid of a range of other surveillance devices.

Last year, the creators of Cyborg Unplug, Julian Oliver and Samim Wininger, asked me to make a number of illustrations explaining how to use the device. Here’s a screenshot from the Cyborg Unplug website:

Cyborg Unplug

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Getting visual

A while ago, Scott Torrance asked me whether it would be okay to include a few of my drawings in an e-book he was putting together.  He sent me a draft version, and lo and behold, it featured the work of some people I admire greatly (plus some people I had never heard of who are also amazing). So of course I said yes.

Little did I know the book, which was eventually published under the title 143 Visuals would make such a splash. First published on gumroad.com, it was then featured on slidehare.net (where it’s been viewed more than 13,000 times, at the time of this writing), and then made its way to iTunes, where it’s still available for free.

In case you’re interested, you can also read a short interview with Scott Torrance on Mike Rohde’s blog Sketchnote Army.

Looking forward to the sequel, 144 Visuals!

143 visuals

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The illustration sprint

You may be familiar with the design sprint, or the book sprint, or the software development sprint, but have you heard of the illustration sprint? I wouldn’t be surprised if you hadn’t, because I just made it up.

The reason for this neologism is that I was recently contacted by the author of a book about startups in Germany, and he wanted a lot of illustrations done quickly. His idea was to sit down for a day and create as many illustrations for the book as possible.

I immediately liked the idea, but realized that the sprint required careful planning. For one thing, the style of the illustrations had to be determined beforehand. Fortunately, my collaborator really liked my sketchnotes about a talk by Mercedes Bunz.

Mercedes Bunz: Copy & Paste (3)

 

After we had established a date, we sat down together at my kitchen table, and started drawing. Surprisingly, only a few images went into the bin, while 36 drawings were considered good enough to be reproduced in the book. Considering that we worked for eight hours straight, that is an average of 13 minutes per drawing!

Here are some of the results:
Illustration sprint

 

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